REFERENCES

for the Unmasking Gender Inequity Report

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DATA SOURCES

Statistics Canada (2019) Labour Force Survey, 2019 Available at: https://hdl.handle.net/11272.1/AB2/ATGWRX

Statistics Canada (2020) “Labour Force Survey, 2020 Available at: https://hdl.handle.net/11272.1/AB2/GGXMM2

Statistics Canada (2020) “Canadian Perspectives Survey Series 1: Impacts of COVID-19 Public Use Microdata File” https://hdl.handle.net/11272.1/AB2/NL02DJ

Statistics Canada (2020) “Canadian Perspective Survey Series 2 – Monitoring the Effects of COVID-19. Public use microdata file” https://hdl.handle.net/11272.1/AB2/Y2DNJ5

Statistics Canada (2020) “Crowdsourcing: Impacts of the COVID-19 on Canadians – Your Mental Health Public Use Microdata File, [2020]” https://hdl.handle.net/11272.1/AB2/RHP5H5

VSE COVID-19 Risk/Reward Assessment Tool

In March 2020, economists at the Vancouver School of Economics developed the VSE COVID-19 Risk/Reward Assessment Tool to measure industry and occupation-specific risk of viral transmission of infection. The tool provides critical information needed to determine the order in which industries could be reopened in a way that minimized the cost measured in health risk versus the benefits measured in output and employment.

The risk of infection was measured over two groups of factors: risks inherent in a specific occupation/ industry and risks related to characteristics of workers in that occupation/ industry.

Occupational qualities used to determine the risk of infection of COVID-19:

  • Physical Proximity: To what extent does this job require the worker to perform job/tasks in close physical proximity to other people?
  • Exposed to Disease or Infection: How often does this job require exposure to disease/ infections?
  • Face-to-Face Discussions/Contact with others: How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job?
  • Outdoors: How often does this job require working outdoors?

Worker characteristics used to determine the risk of infection of COVID-19:

  • Public transit: takes public transit to work, including bus, subway/elevated rail, light rail/streetcar/commuter train and passenger ferry, but excluding carpooling.
  • Works from home: Working from home
  • Crowded dwelling: lives in an “unsuitable dwelling”, where a dwelling is deemed unsuitable if it has too few bedrooms for the size and composition of the household, according to the National Occupancy Standard
  • Living with a health care worker: Lives with someone who works in ambulatory health care services, hospitals, or nursing and residential care facilities.

The VSE risk score ranges from 0 (no risk) to 100 (most risk). More information about the VSE COVID-19 Risk/Reward Assessment Tool can be found here.

This report analysed the four industries that employ the largest share of either women or men (separately) and determined the VSE COVID-19 Risk Index for the top three occupations within each industry.

This analysis can be explored in greater detail in interactive charts.

REFERENCES

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To read the full report, visit unmaskgenderinequity.ca