THIS WEEKEND

However you spend this weekend, I’d encourage each of us to (safely) find a way to lift each other up and share kindness.

I’m not looking forward to this weekend.

Having been raised in a home with two ordained ministers, it’s Easter. For others, it’s Passover or Vaisakhi, or maybe, it’s just simply a long weekend.

Whatever this weekend represents to each of us, what’s likely to be missing will be time with loved ones.

I’m grateful that my son and I are safe, but I’m also feeling a sense of loss at not being surrounded by those I love this weekend. It’s a growing sentiment I’ve heard over these past several weeks. Whether it’s the nurses, physicians, and front line staff at BC Women’s Hospital, the families with loved ones who are critically ill, or those working in essential services and required to isolate – what has already been a very lonely month is only going to be that much harder this weekend.

We are social beings. We need community, and while I remain adamant in the need for social distancing and everyone working together to flatten the curve, I deeply miss my family and friends.

Normally, when you hear from BC Women’s Health Foundation, it’s about a ground-breaking development, or an upcoming event, or sometimes a request for support. Today, it’s just about connection as we head into a weekend that I know will be hard for me, and I suspect for many of you as well. I’ve been mindful of “COVID-19 overload,” and as a Foundation, I’ve chosen for us to be considerate of what, and how often, we communicate with you. These are scary and uncertain times, and I know that when I’m feeling overwhelmed, this is exactly when I would wish to be at the holiday table surrounded by family.

I also recognize my privilege in being able to say that. I am grateful for my safety, my friends, and my family. For the roof over my head, the food on my table, and the health of those close to me.  I am truly fortunate.

What I will reflect on this weekend are the women who are unsheltered, who are in unsafe domestic situations, who are grieving the loss of a loved one, who are sick, isolated and alone, or who have lost jobs, and who are losing hope.

I’ve asked my team, our Board of Directors and our supporters to use this time of great unknown to consider what type of world it is we want to come back to whenever it is we get back to something closer to “normal.”

What we’ve committed to is: not the same. 

BC Women’s Health Foundation is choosing to listen and learn during this time and to emerge with heightened tenacity and unbridled enthusiasm to shape a British Columbia that is healthier, safer, and more inclusive for the women of our province. We cannot afford to have increased inequities and greater divides from economic distress and fear.

So that’s it. No announcement. No fundraising ask. No event to tell you about. I just wanted a little space to be human, to reach out, and feel some connection to our community.

However you spend this weekend, I’d encourage each of us to (safely) find a way to lift each other up and share kindness.

On behalf of everyone at BC Women’s Health Foundation, we send you wishes for good health, love, and safety. Thank you for your support.

Genesa